Charon's boat
oziswhereyoufindit:

Paolo Vincenzo Bonomini

oziswhereyoufindit:

Paolo Vincenzo Bonomini

malformalady:

Tiny body bag

malformalady:

Tiny body bag

wingsandfins:

inkfromtheoctopus:

Private James H. Stokes, Company H, 185th New York Volunteers.
April 1865."Wounded, March 29th, 1865, by a Minie ball at Gravelly Run, Va., gun shot wound of right forearm and elbow, the ball entering at anterior surface, upper third, making its exit from inner aspect of elbow joint, fracturing condyle of humerus in its course. When admitted, the arm and forearm were very much inflamed, and infiltrated with pus. April 3rd, 1865, made an incision one inch in length over joint, outer aspect. The wound made by the ball healed kindly but slowly. Gangrene attacked the incision, May 1st, 1865." - Inscription on back, as stated by Metropolitan Museum.

19th century medical photography borrowed heavily from the portrait genre.  First, it was the only tradition of photography, other than landscape photography; second, they also lacked anything like a zoom lens, making the portrait a more feasible way of depicting wounds and illnesses.  The result was this kind of powerful photograph, where the patient looks you in the eye.

wingsandfins:

inkfromtheoctopus:

Private James H. Stokes, Company H, 185th New York Volunteers.

April 1865.

"Wounded, March 29th, 1865, by a Minie ball at Gravelly Run, Va., gun shot wound of right forearm and elbow, the ball entering at anterior surface, upper third, making its exit from inner aspect of elbow joint, fracturing condyle of humerus in its course. When admitted, the arm and forearm were very much inflamed, and infiltrated with pus. April 3rd, 1865, made an incision one inch in length over joint, outer aspect. The wound made by the ball healed kindly but slowly. Gangrene attacked the incision, May 1st, 1865." - Inscription on back, as stated by Metropolitan Museum.

19th century medical photography borrowed heavily from the portrait genre.  First, it was the only tradition of photography, other than landscape photography; second, they also lacked anything like a zoom lens, making the portrait a more feasible way of depicting wounds and illnesses.  The result was this kind of powerful photograph, where the patient looks you in the eye.

metalonmetalblog:

The Naga Human Skulls are head hunting trophies, which are acquired from enemies. The Naga tribe, from Nagaland, attach animal horns to the skulls of their head hunted victims.

http://skullappreciationsociety.com/naga-tribe-head-hunted-skulls/